The interesting similarities between john f kennedy and abraham lincoln

The later photos show a Pope with a more hooked nose, of a different shape, more rounded, from the earlier Pope. The ear shapes are completely different, including the size of the lobes.

The interesting similarities between john f kennedy and abraham lincoln

Kennedy were both tragically assassinated during their terms in office. Both men were admired by many but actually hated by those who opposed their political views. Shortly after Kennedy was assassinated on 22 Novembera comparison of the circumstances of his death and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln on 14 April surfaced.

That comparison pointed out some amazing coincidences. Questions you may have include: What were the comparisons? Is there any significance to them? Is this just a coincidence or what? This lesson will answer those questions.

Comparison of events The following chart compares the amazing coincidences in the deaths of Lincoln and Kennedy. Some items that are commonly listed in this comparison have been deleted as incorrect, thanks to reader feedback. It is an urban myth that Lincoln had a secretary named Kennedy.

There is no record of that. There is no record whether or not Kennedy's secretary warned him. Booth actually fled to a farm and was killed in a tobacco barn. It might be a stretch to call it a warehouse.

But two years after his death, Booth's body was temporarily moved to a warehouse. Also, after the assassination, the government closed the Ford Theatre and turned it into a warehouse. Other interesting facts Some other interesting facts include: Lincoln's dream Apparently Lincoln had a dream several days before the assassination that he had been killed.

He told his wife that he had seen himself in a casket. A Kennedy uncovers plot In Februarythere was a plot called the "Baltimore Plot" to assassinate Lincoln as he passed through the city. Tad asked his father not to kill the turkey for Thanksgiving.

Although Harry S Truman started the official tradition, Lincoln was the first to "pardon" a Thanksgiving turkey. Now what would be real interesting is if JFK had a pet named Abe or had pardoned someone by that name. Thus far, I haven't heard of that. Skeptics disagree Some skeptics say that you could take any two famous people and find a number of similar-type coincidences between them.

The only problem with that theory is that there really haven't been any listings of such comparisons. And certainly none has been as extensive as the Lincoln-Kennedy similarities. Kennedy are amazingly similar.

It is uncertain if such coincidences have any meaning, but they certainly are strange.General findings. Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and George Washington are most often listed as the three highest-rated Presidents among historians. The remaining places within the Top 10 are often rounded out by Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas Jefferson, Harry S Truman, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight D.

Eisenhower, Andrew Jackson, and John F.

The interesting similarities between john f kennedy and abraham lincoln

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